Types of Questions We Don’t Need to Answer

Question Mark

When a wise man has a controversy with a foolish man, the foolish man either rages or laughs, and there is no rest” (Proverbs 29:9).

It is easy for discussions on controversial issues – either in person or online – to quickly become contentious. This is especially true right now regarding political discussions, but it is also true when it comes to topics that are religious in nature. Contentious discussions can consume our time and mental energy if we allow them to do so.

Questions are often used to draw us into discussions. Some questions are good. Peter said that we must be “ready to make a defense to everyone who asks [us] to give an account for the hope that is in [us]” (1 Peter 3:15). However, some questions do not need to be answered. It is important that we know which questions would fall into this category. The Bible shows us what types of questions we do not need to answer.Continue Reading

Trust in the Lord, Not in Princes

Psalm 118:8-9

It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in man. It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in princes” (Psalm 118:8-9).

People often have a tendency to put their trust in man. They trust that their civil leaders will always protect them, trust that their preacher will always teach them the truth, trust that their elders will always give them wise counsel, etc. While it is possible for these things to often happen, we cannot assume they will always happen. Furthermore, any good that is provided by those in whom we trust is never perfect. This is why the psalmist wrote, “It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in man” (Psalm 118:8).

Immediately after that, the psalmist repeated the phrase with one change. He emphasized the fact that trusting in God is better than trusting in princes (Psalm 118:9). Because civil leaders may maintain security, provide for the people, rule in a way that pleases the people, or be the only government the people have ever known, many place their trust in these rulers. Yet the psalmist said it was better to trust in God. Why?Continue Reading

Understanding Romans 14

Argument

Romans 14 teaches the need to accept and not judge those with whom we differ on matters of opinion. Some have tried to expand the scope of this chapter to include matters of faith. However, we are not to tolerate departures from the faith (cf. Jude 3; Galatians 1:6-9; 2:3-5). Yet on matters of opinion, we need to be sure we understand and apply what Paul wrote in this chapter.

Now accept the one who is weak in faith, but not for the purpose of passing judgment on his opinions.

One person has faith that he may eat all things, but he who is weak eats vegetables only. The one who eats is not to regard with contempt the one who does not eat, and the one who does not eat is not to judge the one who eats, for God has accepted him. Who are you to judge the servant of another? To his own master he stands or falls; and he will stand, for the Lord is able to make him stand.

One person regards one day above another, another regards every day alike. Each person must be fully convinced in his own mind. He who observes the day, observes it for the Lord, and he who eats, does so for the Lord, for he gives thanks to God; and he who eats not, for the Lord he does not eat, and gives thanks to God” (Romans 14:1-6).

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NEW: Plain Bible Teaching Sermons

Plain Bible Teaching Sermons

I am happy to announce a new feature here on the website – Plain Bible Teaching Sermons.Continue Reading

Top 5 Articles on Plain Bible Teaching in 2017

Top 5 Articles in 2017

Here we are at the end of another year. As I have done the past few years, I wanted to highlight the most-read articles on the site for this year. It is always interesting to me to see what makes the list. So here are the “top 5” posts based on the number of page views.Continue Reading

Plain Bible Teaching Podcast (Season 8)

Plain Bible Teaching Podcast

This week we wrapped up Season 8 of the Plain Bible Teaching Podcast. The theme of this season was the Scriptures. You can listen to the audio from all of the episodes on this page. You can also click on the link for each episode to see the show notes and download the audio files if you’d like.
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“I AM”

Jesus and the Pharisees

When God appeared to Moses and called him to lead the Israelites out of Egypt, Moses asked the Lord for His name so he could identify Him when he went to the people. God responded, “I AM WHO I AM…Thus you shall say to the sons of Israel, ‘I AM has sent me to you’” (Exodus 3:14).

When Jesus came to earth, He used this same name for Himself: “Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was born, I am” (John 8:58). Even Jesus’ opponents recognized that He was claiming to be God because they “picked up stones to throw at Him” (John 8:59). This was not the first time something like this happened. Earlier the Jews sought “to kill Him” because He was “calling God His own Father, making Himself equal with God” (John 5:18).

By calling Himself “I am,” Jesus declared Himself to be Deity – God in the flesh (cf. Colossians 2:9). Since Jesus was and is God, there are other facts that are also true about Him. These are highlighted in other “I am” statements of Jesus recorded in the gospel of John.Continue Reading